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January 20, 2021

Two brothers sharing ownership in a successful fourth-generation concrete business had a bitter falling-out triggered by an unlikely issue: a sailboat. The older sibling accused his younger brother of dipping into the company till to support his racing habit.

Two brothers sharing ownership in a successful fourth-generation concrete business had a bitter falling-out triggered by an unlikely issue: a sailboat. The older sibling accused his younger brother of dipping into the company till to support his racing habit.

March 22, 2013

French fashion group PPR has changed its name to Kering, the latest move in its “profound transformation” into a group focused exclusively on the luxury, sport and lifestyle sectors.

French fashion group PPR has changed its name to Kering, the latest move in its “profound transformation” into a group focused exclusively on the luxury, sport and lifestyle sectors.

Second-gen chief executive Francois-Henri Pinault said in a statement: "The change of identity is logical and necessary culmination of the transformation. Beyond a simple change of activity, the new name reflects the new nature of the group."

May 3, 2011

Family-controlled luxury retail group PPR announced on 2 May that it will acquire sportswear brand Volcom for €410.9 million, in a further attempt to refocus PPR on the luxury and lifestyle division. 

Family-controlled luxury retail group PPR announced on 2 May that it will acquire sportswear brand Volcom for €410.9 million, in a further attempt to refocus PPR on the luxury and lifestyle division.

In a statement, the group said that it will buy 100% of California-based Volcom’s shares as it tries to expand PPR’s sports and lifestyle operations. It expects the deal to be completed by the third quarter of the year.

The purchase is a further example of PPR’s strategy to specialise in clothes and accessories focused on the luxury markets.

July 19, 2010

On the surface family feuds don’t look so good for business. They mean decisions are often put off as family energies get diverted to emotional disputes, not the running of the company, writes David Bain

On the surface family feuds don't look so good for business. They mean decisions are often put off as family energies get diverted to emotional disputes between members, not the running of the company, writes David Bain. 

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